YOGA: Skill to Mastery Core Activation Scale

Russian researchers discovered that teaching the segments of a new movement in their sequential order from start to finish is not necessarily as effective as teaching the action in the reverse order (Vorobyev, 1978). They examined the effect of breaking down movements into basic components and having athletes learn each element separately before attempting the whole movement. This method of component learning also proved to be superior to the conventional method of natural sequence learning.

For each yoga flow there is a beginning, middle, and ending component. Once you understand the breakdown process of beginning, middle, and ending elementary motor components, you gain the ability to engineer the educational sequence of movement: + Forward engineering: Learning components from beginning to ending + Reverse engineering: Learning components from ending to beginning + Lateral engineering: Learning middle components, then beginning and ending These tools work differently for individual learning styles.

One of the crucial secrets to moving from asana to vinyasa and from vinyasa to prasara in your yoga is the movement in between. Every flow has beginning, middle, and ending elementary motor components. Tie together asana into flows. Do this by breaking the asana into elementary motor components.

How is this possible? The goal is to discover that the ending component of one asana flows seamlessly into the beginning component of another asana, forming the chain. Realize that there is no beginning and ending to movement. Rather, movement in life is composed of only middle components. There is only transition! Realize the movement in between and you gain the ability to analyze any movement as sequences of building blocks and to alter and combine building blocks into any sequences.

Every yoga flow involves a beginning, middle, and ending component. Even an asana contains these three components, and in most yoga practices how one enters a pose, the beginning component, is the same as how one departs from a pose, the ending component. In as ana, it is the middle component where one concentrates on finding the balance of strength and surrender, and once one does, applying effort, and once one can, applying persistence. Once we’ve been able to persist in two asana (most yoga teachers suggest three minutes as a measuring stick), then we can begin to sequence or link them together. We must be able to breathe through the transition between the two as ana. In particular, we must be able to discipline the breath (exhale through the effort). If we cannot exhale through the effort of transitioning between the two asana, then we need to concentrate more on the departing asana, the arriving asana, and the transitional asana.

The departing and arriving asana are easy enough for us to understand, but we often find it difficult to wrap our mind around transitional asana because they are sometimes not orthodox positions. We must realize that the purpose of moving to vinyasa is to synchronize our breath with the transition. We have already integrated our breath within the two asana, but now we must breathe between them.

How is this possible? The goal is to discover the ending component of one as ana and how it flows seamlessly into the beginning component of another asana, forming an unbroken kinetic chain.

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